G. Hermon Slade Trophy > G. Hermon Slade Trophy 2009

 

G. Hermon Slade Trophy 2009

The G Hermon Slade Trophy 2009 for the Champion Australasian Native Orchid Hybrid of the Year was won by Dendrobium Roy Tokunaga.

A beautiful plant (shown below) is owned by Bonnie Bennett and the hybridist being H & RN Nurseries. It had three racemes of beautifully presented flowers with petals of crystalline white with sepals pale green. The plant was exhibited at the ANOS Far North Coast Spring Show August 2009. Granted Champion Australasian Orchid and Reserve Champion of the Show.

 

The following nominations received a G Hermon Slade Hybrid Certificate

  • Dockrilla (mortii X Tweetie) X Grumpy - L & B Dobson
  • Dendrobium Australian Ginger - Henk van den Berg (Hybridiser: Australian Orchid Nursery)
  • Dockrillia Tweetie 'Pie' -  Brian and Phena Gerhard (Hybridiser: P Spence)

The G Hermon Slade Trophy 2009 for the Champion Australasian Native Species of the Year has been awarded retrospectively to Dendrobium striaenopsis 'Faye', owned by W. Brown. This plant was Grand Champion of the 2009 Tweed District Orchid Society show.

The orchid that was originally chosen as the winner of the G Hermon Slade Trophy 2009 was Robiquetia wassellii owned by Dendi Orchids. This entrant has had to be disqualified because Robiquetia wassellii is an Australian endemic species, according to existing scientific evidence and was thus ineligible for nomination as Champion Australasian Native Species of the Year. The nomination of this plant had been accepted on the basis of erroneous distributional information contained in an orchid database consulted by the judges. The Ira Butler Trophy Committee apologises to the entrants and to the community of Australian orchid growers for mistakenly accepting this nomination. Dendi Orchids’ plant of Robiquetia wassellii has been retrospectively granted an award of special recognition for the Bill Murdoch Trophy 2009.

The name of the retrospective winner of the G Hermon Slade Trophy 2009 for the Champion Australasian Native Species of the Year warrants further comment. This plant was nominated as Dendrobium phalaenopsis, and in keeping with established practice of the Ira Butler Trophy Committee, the species name provided by the nominator was used as the name of the plant when the results of the 2009 awards were published in The Orchadian and on this web site. The Committee has, however, chosen to change the name of this plant to Dendrobium striaenopsis, now that it has been elevated to trophy winner, in order to avoid confusion.

Until now, the Committee has deliberately avoided imposing any particular “authoritative” taxonomy on nominations and instead has accepted species names provided by nominees on the condition that they be nomenclaturally legitimate and consistent with taxonomic circumscriptions that are, or have recently been, in current use. For example, the Committee has accepted nominations of species and hybrids under the generic names Diplodium and Dockrillia, even though these names are not generally accepted by plant taxonomists. Similarly, the Committee has accepted nominations under the name Dendrobium speciosum, even though most plant taxonomists recognise numerous taxa within this species complex at either specific or infraspecific ranks.

Until recently, several different circumscriptions of the name Dendrobium phalaenopsis were in general use by both scientists and orchid growers. One mistakenly interpreted Dendrobium phalaenopsis as being restricted to the Tanimbar Islands of eastern Indonesia. Another interpreted Dendrobium phalaenopsis as being widespread from north-eastern Australia to eastern Indonesia, sometimes with the Australian and Indonesian populations separated as different varieties. A third saw Dendrobium phalaenopsis as an Australian endemic taxon, either at specific rank or as a variety of Dendrobium bigibbum. Bill Brown nominated his plant as Dendrobium phalaenopsis using either the first or second circumscriptions of this name. In 1989 Mark Clements and David Jones published a new name, Dendrobium striaenopsis, to apply to the population formerly known as Dendrobium phalaenopsis or Dendrobium phalaenopsis var. schroederianum or Dendrobium bigibbum subsp. laratensis from the Tanimbar Islands. It is to this Australasian, not Australian, taxon that Bill Brown’s plant belongs.

 

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